On programming productivity

Measuring programmer productivity is notably hard. It’s the topic of numerous, variable length publications.

Much of coding can be succintly cuantified and estimated; time should probably be spent automating those tasks, as those are the boring, repetitive, well-defined ones, like creating a CRUD or converting some programming-language-level construct into a interface-level-representation such as JSON or XML.

The other part is hard to estimate, mostly because it combines several tasks, like getting to know the domain, figuring out what needs to get done and actually doing it in a polished manner.

Some things that are usually oversimplified in attempts to measure programmer productivity, sometimes to hilarious effect: amount of lines of code, time spent sitting at the computer, and amount of artifacts produced.

All of those means of measurement can backfire hideously by creating the wrong incentives (lots of boilerplate, woolgathering, overengineering, overestimating work length).

Here are a few important measurements that can be made to help track this elusive statistic:

  • Explain your work to your teams regularly. Have them rate it. Keep a history. State what’s being solved, why it was solved in this particular way, what tradeoffs were involved, any difficulties you ran into, and how you overcame them. Ratings on two indicators are crucial: problem complexity and performance. They should include justifications to help you home into better practices.
  • Keep track of all the bugs in your code, the stage at which they were noticed, and the time that fixing them required.
  • Keep track of the references to your code, especially if you’re writing tools.
  • Have your peers rate you on helpfulness and knowledgeability.

If you encounter any unintended side effects or incentives, please let me know. Up to now, the only bug I’ve found for this kind of process is the popularity-contest-like aspect it can sometimes take. Thus the objective numbers I slid in there to help balance. If you find other ways to improve on this, let me know.

 

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