Retrospective: Clean Code – Boy Scouts, Writers, and Mythical Creatures

Yesterday I gave a talk on Clean Code, based in content by Uncle Bob and Geoffrey Gerriets.

I had some technical issues – so I had no access to my presenter notes, damping my performance somewhat… and after I’d taken such pains to learn from Geoffrey’s talk at PyCaribbean on Code Review, Revision and Technical Debt.

The subtitle for my talk was: “Clean Code, Boy Scouts, Writers, and Mythical Creatures”.

It starts out by talking about the features of clean code, as described by Uncle Bob and his interviewed few in his book Clean Code – and comparing each group of aspects to physical things we can look up to, like a Tesla Model X, a pleasant beach, or a bike… all of which share traits desirable in our code.

Then going on to the maxim of “leaving the campground better than we found it”, with a nice example of some code taken from the IOCCC and how much more legible it became merely by reindenting it,  putting in relief the long term impact of little incremental changes.

The latter half of the talk was derived from lessons learned at Geoffrey’s talk: the process of a professional writer, compared to the process of a professional coder, and how they’re alike; the lessons form the writers’ day to day can be applied to our coding: design, write, revise, rewrite, proofread; some attention was given to the way that reviews may be given. The mythical creatures section –  which represent the different stages at which a developer may find himself – are an aid to this latter part of the talk by pointing out patterns of behavior that identify what may be important or not for a certain developer at a certain point in their growth. The advice to treat things that may be beneath a developer’s level as trivia and/or minutiae, as well as the advice on focusing and choosing improvements to point out instead of “trouble” may be the best of this part of the talk.

After realizing I’d burnt through the presentation and posing some questions to the audience, we discussed some interesting points:

  • How can code comments make code cleaner or dirtier?
  • How can rewrites alter our coding behavior?
  • How can we find time to have a re-writing flow if the management doesn’t know any better?

The mileage may vary, of course, so several people pitched in and we didn’t draw any firm conclusions, only presented ideas to try, which was interesting.

In the end, we came out with some good ideas on how to keep code from stagnating… hopefully our future selves will have ever fewer messes to deal with :^)

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